NJ Neuropathy

Non-Surgical Relief from Neuropathy

NJ Neuropathy treatment - Bergen/Passaic County

The periphery of the central nervous system is one of the busiest networks in the human body, but it is also a source of a lot of pain and suffering in a myriad of forms. In fact, there are more than 100 recognized peripheral nerve disorders. Although the periphery of most things may be defined as of lesser or secondary importance, people suffering from peripheral neuropathy are not likely to agree with that.

Diabetic nerve damage has become one of the curses of old age when rising blood sugar damages the nerves, commonly in the legs and feet of Type 1 and Type 2 diabetics. It is often linked to diabetes, but there are a number of other causes.

Peripheral neuropathy is often misdiagnosed for other conditions with similar symptoms such as spinal stenosis. Mainstream medicine has practiced nerve decompression surgery for some time to effectively reduce pain and other complications of peripheral neuropathy, diabetic and otherwise. Its symptoms range from annoying to life threatening and include burning pain, paralysis and sexual dysfunction.

But why go through surgery and the uncertainty of its irreversible outcomes when you can opt for a non-surgical option relying on photobiostimulation, a deep tissue cold-laser therapy in concert with spinal decompression, to treat neuropathy? This healing potential is offered through the Butler Spine Program.

Spinal Stress Can Cut Off Nerve’s Lifeline

Neuropathy occurs when disease or damage is incurred in the nerves that transmit messages from the brain and spinal cord throughout the entire body. But the source of this damage may well be in the spine itself where a herniated disc squeezes the nerves, impeding blood flow carrying nutrients, even shutting it off altogether, until deterioration ultimately diseases or damages receptor nerves.

The key is easing pressure from the spine and reversing the stress on the nerves through spinal decompression. Non surgical spinal decompression therapy is a minimally invasive therapy which can offer such a result and is also part of the Butler Spine Program.

The peripheral system is comprised of three types of nerves that are directly influenced by the central nervous system— each with a distinct function—which explains why there is such a wide range of symptoms associated with neuropathy.

The three classes of nerves are:

√ Autonomic nerves — regulating blood pressure, respiration, heart rate, digestion and the bladder, etc.

√ Motor nerves — controlling muscle movement

√ Sensory nerves — receiving sensations from the skin of pain, pleasure, heat and touch

The sensory nerves are of particular interest because they are the source of both pleasure and pain and the accelerated healing power of decompression therapy is especially effective and noticeable with the sensory nerves.

Peripheral nerves originate from the spinal cord and extend along a network of lines throughout the body called dermatomes. The injury to one dermatome may be just the beginning as it radiates out to others and often, from there, to peripheral areas like the feet or hands.  Once it interferes with communication to the brain it might result in divergent sensations like numbness and intense pain.

There a number of factors, aside from diabetes, that might result in peripheral neuropathy, including heredity, infection, disease and even poor dietary habits.

—Call us today at (201) 651-9100 at Oakland Spine & Physical Therapy to learn how acupuncture might remove pain from your life.

 

Including PT in Integrated Care

massage

Counting Physical Therapy In

Like chiropractic care, a primary goal of physical therapy is to heal and treat without relying on drugs and therapy. One of the chief differences is that physical therapy is more closely associated with mainstream medicine and is even prescribed by medical practices before and after surgery.

PT (and chiropractic care, for that matter) goes back to ancient times when massage and the relief that comes from water that we now call hydrotherapy are believed to be used by Greek physician Hippocrates, known as the father of medicine. In a sense, you could say he is also the father of physical therapy. However, it took centuries before PT was regarded as accepted health care, although one element, fitness training, pre-dates it by centuries. PT went mainstream with the polio epidemic in the 1940’s and 1950’s when manual therapy techniques were used to help restore muscle function.

The modern physical therapist is also trained in massage, but specialties now include post-operative care, orthopedic, cardiovascular and neurologic and pulmonary rehabilitation. Those specialties are usually just that, and few physical therapy practices provide treatment in all of these areas.

TorticollisIntegrating Multiple Therapies

Physical therapists and chiropractors can work together under the same roof, so to speak, to provide integrated care.

Dr. Brad Butler, Chief of Staff at Oakland Spine & Physical Therapy believes that “physical therapy is probably the best thing out there for treating the muscular components of the spine.” It is also critical for functional improvements, postural improvements, flexibility and strength.

“However, the big difference between hospital-based physical therapy, a stand alone physical therapy center, and an integrated center like ours, is the applied philosophy of what works best,” Dr. Butler reports. “We believe that integrated physical therapy with other therapies lead to a faster and more comprehensive patient response.”

The American Physical Therapy Association (APTA) explains that PTs examine each care recipient (“patient” is generally not used because it applies to medical care) and “develop a plan using treatment techniques to promote the ability to move, reduce pain, restore function, and prevent disability.” In addition, PTs develop fitness programs for individuals as a means to maintain or improve mobility, as well as ensuring more active and healthier lifestyles with programs they can follow on their own. In post-operative therapy, for instance, care continues after leaving PT via programs the individual can use on his or her own.

There are obviously many similarities between PT and chiropractic care, and the integration of the two healing disciplines is a natural transition under the all-encompassing umbrella of health care.

 

Why Website Words Seem Familiar

Computer

The Common Denominator of Chiropractic Searching

If you do much online research on chiropractic care, you are bound to see an amazing amount of repetition on practitioners’ websites. We’re talking word-for-word by the hundreds, and though this might be technically defined as plagiarism, nobody seems to complain too much.

That is because much of the purloined parlance is within the industry, so to speak. Quoting information that educates the public on the advantages of chiropractic care and mainstream studies that cite its many advantages, seems to be shared material for chiropractic practices all over the country. Plus it is proven and factual.

Aside from informational pages on these websites, you’ll also see this wholesale misappropriation of wordage in blogs on sites promoting everything from nutrition to acupuncture. Bloggers should know better, since they are usually professional writers and copywriters, but, then again, why not repeat someone else’s writing if you can’t state it any better?

Look at it this way. If it was your writing showing up on websites all over the country, you might actually feel complimented because so many people in the field preferred your words over their own.

WhiplashChiropractors are not alone. This seems to be particularly pervasive in the healing arts, including medical doctors, dentists and even healthcare financial advisors. Their websites are replete with hundreds of words lifted from elsewhere, and it is almost impossible to trace their origin.  

We’ve found numerous websites that are sharing writing without attribution, but we doubt anyone is going to mind all that much, because what’s good for one is apparently good for all— as long as the author doesn’t complain.

Take, for example, the following 65 words (part of several hundred but we don’t need to devote that many words to make the point):

In the United States, chiropractic is often considered a complementary health approach. According to the 2007 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS), which included a comprehensive survey of the use of complementary health approaches by Americans, about 8 percent of adults (more than 18 million) and nearly 3 percent of children (more than 2 million) had received chiropractic or osteopathic manipulation in the past 12 months…

Even though this survey is pretty much outdated more than a decade later, we found the above passage unchanged on 54 different sites all over the country and once in the UK. Most were chiropractic sites, but it was also on sites promoting pain therapy, yoga, cancer treatment, Chinese martial arts, holistic nursing, massage therapy, a suburban newspaper and even Wikipedia (the subject was therapeutic touch).

 

Is Surgery Necessary for Carpal Tunnel Syndrome?

Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is the most common peripheral entrapment neuropathy—that is, it’s the most common place to trap a nerve in the extremities (arms or legs). CTS affects 6-11% of adults in the general population, and it occurs in women more often than men. The cause is often difficult to determine but the most common reasons can include trauma, repetitive maneuvers, certain diseases, pregnancy, being over the age of 50, and obesity.

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Carpal Tunnel Syndrome – Why Is It SO Common?

According to the literature, Carpal Tunnel Syndrome (CTS) is one of the most prevalent upper extremity complaints. In fact, it IS the most common “compression neuropathy” (of which there are many) and affects 3-6% of adults in the general population. Additionally, CTS can affect BOTH hands in up to 50% of patients with the condition!

The CA– USE of CTS is often unknown and typically comes on gradually, making it difficult to determine a definite cause or specific “date of onset” for CTS.

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Carpal Tunnel Syndrome – Let’s Get the FACTS! (Part 3)

This month, we will conclude our three-part series on important facts regarding carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS).

CTS TREATMENT OPTIONS (continued): Aside from the carpal tunnel, there are several places where the median nerve can become compressed as it travels from the neck, down through the shoulder, through tight muscular areas of the upper arm and forearm, and finally through the carpal tunnel at the wrist. In order to achieve good, long-lasting results, treatment must focus on relieving compression at any point along the course of the nerve. This is why chiropractic works SO WELL as it addresses ALL of these areas using manual adjustments, muscle release techniques, and even physical therapy modalities.

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The “Many Faces” of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

Carpal Tunnel Syndrome (CTS) can present with a very mild, occasional numbness or tingling in the thumb, index, middle, and ring fingers and may never progress much beyond that point. But, for other patients, CTS is a painful, rapidly progressive problem that requires immediate attention. What makes it mild for some and bad for others? Let’s take a look!

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