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Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

Joint Pain: Healing Before Surgery

When joint pain becomes part of your life, you typically have two choices. Do you want to treat what is causing the problem or do you want to wait for significant deterioration and then choose your fate? At some point, when it comes to your joints, especially the knees, hips and ankles that carry your weight around, the only choice is surgery.

The first choice is almost always a mechanical issue, which is the core of chiropractic care. Most definitions of chiropractic care in the healthcare field mention “manipulation,” specifically of the spine and other bodily structures. Technically, manipulation does take place within the multiple disciplines of chiropractic care, but just in the physical sense.  Manipulation literally requires being manipulative, and that tends to be a negative characteristic when referring to feelings and emotions.

What we’re really talking about in both chiropractic care and physical therapy, are mechanical treatments,

“They stimulate the body to begin the repair process while, at the same time, recovering the condition that caused the pain to begin with,” explains Dr. Brad Butler, Chief of Staff at Oakland Spine & Physical Therapy. “What we have found is that at the extreme end stages of joint deterioration, there is a point of no return and surgery is typically the only option.”

Deterioration Complicates the SituationKnee Pain

Time flies and the initial phase of joint pain will ultimately pass. Eventually the mechanical treatments won’t resolve this dilemma of deterioration, even though we might be able to temporarily ease the pain and keep prescription medicines and surgery at bay.

Joint pain is a dilemma that is growing, and it appears medicine is evolving into an increasing number of remedies and techniques that treat the end-result of painful joint issues instead of actually striking early enough to heal.

We at Oakland Spine & Physical Therapy submit that only mechanical therapies can treat the mechanical dysfunction that created the problem that started it all. Medical advances, however, are still committed to treating and recovering the effects, even though surgical approaches, for example, are becoming less traumatic and less invasive. In the end they are offering the same old thing.

Replacing that knee, which is now your sole option after living with and medicating the pain over the years, is now a smoother, faster and more efficient surgical process. Additionally, its design and components are commonly giving that new knee a lifespan of thirty years.

What if the alternative were a healing process that corrects the mechanical dysfunction before it turns into a deteriorating arthritic joint that can only be resolved in the operating room? What if knee pain were only a fleeting memory, allowing you to remain mobile and pain-free for decades on the knees you were born with?

—Call us today at (201) 651-9100 for an appointment at Oakland Spine & Physical Therapy…

 

Why Website Words Seem Familiar

Computer

The Common Denominator of Chiropractic Searching

If you do much online research on chiropractic care, you are bound to see an amazing amount of repetition on practitioners’ websites. We’re talking word-for-word by the hundreds, and though this might be technically defined as plagiarism, nobody seems to complain too much.

That is because much of the purloined parlance is within the industry, so to speak. Quoting information that educates the public on the advantages of chiropractic care and mainstream studies that cite its many advantages, seems to be shared material for chiropractic practices all over the country. Plus it is proven and factual.

Aside from informational pages on these websites, you’ll also see this wholesale misappropriation of wordage in blogs on sites promoting everything from nutrition to acupuncture. Bloggers should know better, since they are usually professional writers and copywriters, but, then again, why not repeat someone else’s writing if you can’t state it any better?

Look at it this way. If it was your writing showing up on websites all over the country, you might actually feel complimented because so many people in the field preferred your words over their own.

WhiplashChiropractors are not alone. This seems to be particularly pervasive in the healing arts, including medical doctors, dentists and even healthcare financial advisors. Their websites are replete with hundreds of words lifted from elsewhere, and it is almost impossible to trace their origin.  

We’ve found numerous websites that are sharing writing without attribution, but we doubt anyone is going to mind all that much, because what’s good for one is apparently good for all— as long as the author doesn’t complain.

Take, for example, the following 65 words (part of several hundred but we don’t need to devote that many words to make the point):

In the United States, chiropractic is often considered a complementary health approach. According to the 2007 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS), which included a comprehensive survey of the use of complementary health approaches by Americans, about 8 percent of adults (more than 18 million) and nearly 3 percent of children (more than 2 million) had received chiropractic or osteopathic manipulation in the past 12 months…

Even though this survey is pretty much outdated more than a decade later, we found the above passage unchanged on 54 different sites all over the country and once in the UK. Most were chiropractic sites, but it was also on sites promoting pain therapy, yoga, cancer treatment, Chinese martial arts, holistic nursing, massage therapy, a suburban newspaper and even Wikipedia (the subject was therapeutic touch).

 

How Much Is a Pound of Cure Worth?

Running

When we talk about medicine and medical doctors, we are not denigrating them as adversaries of chiropractors or chiropractic care. It’s not a case of either one or the other. The two may go hand in hand, and often do,

Both are healing sciences, but the chief difference is that one is preventative in nature and purpose, more about bolstering our immunity and keeping disease away than treating disease that is already there.

‘Medicine is the best at treating the symptoms of disease after it’s already present We will all need it at some point in our lives and I am grateful that we have the best medical doctors in the world in our country,” says Dr. Brad Butler, Chief of Staff at the Oakland Spine & Rehabilitation Centers in Oakland and Wayne, NJ. “However, medicine is limited because it’s mainly centered on either early detection of disease or treating the disease after it’s already present.”

We are essentially prisoners in a high-priced healthcare system that is run primarily by medicine. The treatment of existing disease is a lot more expensive than preventing disease and adopting healthy lifestyles.

Prevention Best Option of All

There is a big push in medicine toward early detection, which is just another justification for drugs and surgery, chiropractic professionals believe. Finding disease early when it is most treatable is certainly better than dealing with it in an end-stage scenario. However, the best option of all is to prevent disease before it can happen.

A growing number of medical doctors are seeing the light by using preventive approaches in their practices, including educating patients on nutrition and healthy habits like exercising, refraining from tobacco use, moderation in alcohol consumption and overeating.

A big part of preventative medicine is to motivate the patient or individual to adopt the practices that would prevent diseases that might otherwise occur with continued poor lifestyle choices.

For example, as many as eighty percent of American adults suffer from back pain. Do you wait until the pain is so great that potent drugs and surgery are the only options?

Poor Richard (a.k.a. Benjamin Franklin) admonished us that “an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.” That pound of cure was costing each of us on average of $10,348 per person in 2016 for health care. The per capita cost for prescription drugs alone, as of the spring of 2018, was about $1,500, according to a study by the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA).

If the medical doctors can see the toll this is taking it is truly a time for dramatic changes in health care.

—Call us today at (201) 651-9100 for an appointment at Oakland Spine & Physical Therapy…

Making Smart Decisions on Joint Health

It has never been a more important time than now to be an educated consumer when it comes to joint health. In previous generations, perhaps as recently as your parents, bad backs, knees, hips, and other joints have relegated those in their forties, fifties and sixties to decades of restricted mobility.

There are so many options, so many decisions to make, that will affect the quality of your life for years to come, that will determine whether you get to live happily ever after.

Consumers will have to be more informed than ever in conquering, or a least living with, joint and back pain.

Educated consumers have to choose what is best for them.  Joint pain is a growing dilemma and it isn’t going anywhere.  Patients have to decide whether they want to treat what’s causing the problem — which is almost always a mechanical issue— or whether they what to wait until significant deterioration occurs and choose their fate?

Knee and hip surgery and replacements are becoming commonplace, with the latter already among the most routinely performed surgeries, approaching 10 million men and women with these implants. Many of them are young enough that they may face replacements of their replacements 20 to 30 years down the road.

Then there are those millions of Americans with ongoing back pain. Those who suffer with it are getting younger, and it is already the leading cause of disability in adults under the age of 45. And, yes, spinal implants of sections of vertebrae are already here.

Medicine has evolved into more treatments of the consequences of these conditions, but only physical therapy and mechanical adjustments can treat the mechanical dysfunction that created the problem in the first place.

It is also true medical advances will continue and that they will become less invasive and less traumatic at doing the same old thing — treating by masking the effects of the ailment once prevention or structural rehabilitation is no longer feasible.

Stimulating Bodily Repair

Mechanical treatments like chiropractic care and physical therapy are superior because they stimulate the body to repair itself, at the same time recovering the initial painful condition and redirecting it on a more healthful trajectory.

Joint pain leading to disability is a dilemma for a growing number of Americans in their forties, fifties, sixties, and seventies. That means increasing millions of people are soon going to have to make choices, including surgery, physical therapy, chiropractic modalities and even stem cell treatment in the coming decades.

According to researchers at the U. S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, there are an estimated 15 million people in the United States suffering from severe joint pain.  Going by the pain scale many doctors use— with zero representing no pain and 10 being the worst possible pain— anything seven or higher is in the severe range.

Then there are those in the moderate range of four to seven on the scale, many of whom will shortly be suffering severe joint pain. Now is the time for them to start making educated decisions.

—Call us today at (201) 651-9100 for an appointment at Oakland Spine & Physical Therapy.

Dr. Brad’s Weekly Health Update: A Good Night’s Sleep May Save Your Life

A Good Night’s Sleep May Save Your Life

Good sleep quality for men may mean the difference between life and death. In this study, researchers analyzed long-term data on more than 823,000 men in the United States and found that men under the age of 65 who slept just three to five hours per night were 55% more likely to develop fatal prostate cancer than those who slept seven hours nightly. Study author Dr. Susan Gapstur adds, “If confirmed in other studies, these findings would contribute to evidence suggesting the importance of obtaining adequate sleep for better health.” American Association for Cancer Research, April 2017

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Dr. Brad’s Weekly Health Update: The surprising new way to battle depression & anxiety

How to keep your health on track this holiday season

Yoga may help those with major depression.

Sudarshan Kriya yoga focuses on rhythmic breathing exercises that aim to place the mind into a deep, restful state. A new study finds this yoga discipline may prove to be an effective drug-free approach to treating anxiety and depression symptoms. The study found that compared with participants in a control group, those with major depressive disorder who completed an 8-week breathing-based yoga program experienced significant improvements in their anxiety and depression symptoms. Research fellow Dr. Anup Sharma adds, “With such a large portion of patients who do not fully respond to antidepressants, it’s important we find new avenues that work best for each person to beat their depression. Here, we have a promising, lower-cost therapy that could potentially serve as an effective, non-drug approach for patients battling this disease.” Journal of Clinical Psychiatry, November 2016

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Dr. Brad’s Weekly Health Update: Your bedtime habits could be sabotaging your sleep

Is too much TV hazardous to your health

Your habits just before going to bed could be sabotaging your sleep.

The National Sleep Foundation recommends avoiding the following: over-the-counter medications that contain pseudoephedrine, which can be found in common cold medicines; texting, watching TV, or spending time on the computer shortly before bed; indulging in a greasy, fattening, salty bedtime snack, which can be stimulating and trigger nightmares; and drinking caffeine beyond the morning, as it can stay in your system for as long as twelve hours. National Sleep Foundation, October 2016

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Dr. Brad’s Weekly Health Update: 7 ways to reduce your risk for age-related cognitive decline

Introducing babies to eggs and peanuts before their first birthday may help decrease their risk of food allergies

Introducing babies to eggs and peanuts before their first birthday may help decrease their risk of food allergies.

A review of 146 studies found that babies fed eggs when they were 4 to 6 months old and children given peanuts between 4 and 11 months of age had lower risks for allergies to those foods during childhood than kids not exposed to eggs and peanuts early in life. Dr. Matthew Greenhawt, an allergy specialist at Children’s Hospital Colorado in Aurora concludes, “Delay of introduction of these foods may be associated with some degree of potential harm, and early introduction of selected foods appears to have a well-defined benefit.” Journal of the American Medical Association, September 2016

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