NJ Pain Management

Chronic Whiplash Injuries and Pain Thresholds

Researchers have observed a phenomenon called “central sensitization” (CS) that is common in patients who have long-term, chronic pain following trauma such as whiplash. With CS, the patient’s ability to feel pain is abnormally high or hypersensitive, so when pain from pressure, temperature, electrical, or other sources is applied to the skin, they feel it sooner and more intensely than individuals without CS.

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Women with Back Pain… The Silent Majority? Part 1

Women with Back Pain

Because humans are bipeds—that is, two-legged animals—our spines tend to experience greater loads than those our four-legged friends. This leads to men and women experiencing degenerative conditions such as osteoarthritis much earlier in life compared with lions, tigers, and bears (and your dog or cat). Also, the majority of us (about 90%) have one leg that’s shorter than the other (average 5.2mm or ¼ inch), which can tilt the pelvis downward on the side with the shorter leg, which increases the risk for both back pain and neck pain. Fortunately, this can be rectified with a heel lift in the shoe. However, women also face unique anatomical, physiological, and social challenges when it comes to back pain…

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Exercises on a Swiss Ball Help Back Pain Patients!

In previous articles, we’ve explored how to individualize an exercise program for those with back pain. This month, we’ll look at why utilizing a Swiss ball may be more helpful for the back pain patient than simply doing floor-based exercises.

In a 2015 study published in the Journal of Sports Science and Medicine, researchers assigned twelve chronic (more than three months) low back pain (cLBP) patients to perform either floor- or ball-based exercises three times a week for eight weeks using four different motions or exercises.

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Dr. Brad’s Weekly Health Update: Stress and Well-Being Linked to Spinal Pain

Stress and Well-Being Linked to Spinal Pain

Danish researchers recently surveyed 45,371 ten- to fourteen-year-old children and found that spinal pain is a common complaint among this group, often co-occurring with stress and poor general well- being. The research team posits that addressing stress and well-being among teenagers could lower their overall risk for both back and neck pain during adolescence and possibly into adulthood. European Journal of Pediatrics, May 2017

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Have You Tried This for Your Back Pain?

NJ Low Back Pain Treatment -Bergen/Passaic County

It’s not uncommon for low back pain patients to reduce their activities in an effort to avoid their pain. Unfortunately, it’s likely their core muscles—the muscles that help support their midsection—will become deconditioned over time due to inactivity, which may only increase the risk of further injury. Therefore, to effectively improve one’s low back pain status, he or she must first strengthen and keep their core muscles strong! Think in terms of one to three sets of ten reps for ease of application and ALWAYS release the exercise SLOWLY—don’t just drop back from the end-range of the exercise.

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A Pain in the Hip?

Women with Back Pain

When you ask people to point to their hip joint, it’s very interesting to see the vast number of places where people point—the low back, side of the pelvis, front of the pelvis, in the groin, and more! If one were to draw a line between the back and front pocket, that’s basically the hip joint.

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